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kenji ido creates a sculptural dwelling with a saw-tooth roof

Kenji Ido designs a sculptural white wooden house in Ota City, Tokyo, Japan, accentuated by a distinctive saw-tooth roof. Echoing its surroundings, where the urban sprawl meets the tranquil rice fields, the one-story residence adopts a dynamic zigzag layout, anchored by a central courtyard. Overcoming challenges of privacy and natural lighting, the architect strategically harnesses volumetric design and precise placement of openings to flood the living spaces with light, ensuring harmony between the facade and interior realms.

all images by Yohei Sasakura

house in ota ensures privacy and promotes natural lighting

The architect proposes a saw-tooth roof, historically used in industrial and manufacturing buildings, to fill the house’s interior with natural light. To ensure privacy, Kenji Ido strategically minimized window sizes at eye level on the roadside, instead giving space to expansive windows facing the enclosed courtyard, shielded from its surroundings by a towering wall. The geometrical form of the shell and the choice of the white color for its facade make house in Ota look like a sculpture.

sculptural saw-tooth roof tops kenji ido's white residence in japan
Kenji Ido strategically minimized window sizes at eye level on the roadside to ensure privacy

light-reflecting ceiling illuminates house in ota

An interior reflecting the characteristic saw-tooth shape of the rooftop expands underneath it, to create a series of sculpture-like spaces. Kenji Ido opted for minimalistic details, with broad ash floors, pristine white walls, and sunlit surfaces. As the sun’s angle shifts with the seasons, its rays bounce off the ceiling in winter, illuminating the space like a natural reflector. From the entrance, through the hallway, living area, dining room, and into the children’s quarters, the layout winds along, offering glimpses of the serene courtyard. Bay windows jut out at angles, framing views of cherry blossoms in spring along the Daimon River. Even utilitarian spaces like the bathroom are infused with light, courtesy of high windows that flood the area with sunlight.

sculptural saw-tooth roof tops kenji ido's white residence in japan
the residence adopts a distinctive zigzag layout

sculptural saw-tooth roof tops kenji ido's white residence in japan
the saw-tooth roof, historically used in industrial and manufacturing buildings, fills the house with natural light

sculptural saw-tooth roof tops kenji ido's white residence in japan
the architect places a courtyard in the center of the building

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